Dewine gas taxes increase

Camron D. '21, Writer

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Ohio Governor, Mike Dewine has proposed a 18-cent increase in gas per gallon in Ohio. This will be a 64 percent increase in our normal gas tax which is now at 28-cent per gallon. This new increase will raise about $725 million a year. The money will go to the state’s highway and bridge network while earning about $480 million a year for local government streets, according to Cincinnati.com.

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof said he will most likely make higher gas taxes so people would pay at the pump with an income tax cut. Obhof also stated that some senators support imposing fees on alternative fuel vehicles such as electric cars and hybrids to make things fair.

This law will go into effect by March 31. Ohio gas tax costs the average motorist $146.30 per year, assuming they drive 12,900 miles and get 24.7 miles per gallon, according to the Dayton Daily News. Motorists on average pay $516 in annual maintenance costs due to poor road conditions. In Ohio, such maintenance costs range from $397 in Dayton to $615 in Cleveland.

“I think it is really stupid to increase the prices of gas when the gas is already expensive and then have to now pay more which is ridiculous. It might be good for the economy but honestly I don’t understand the main reason in why increasing taxes for gas is gonna lead to better increases in the economy,” Taylor L. ’21 said.

The public is furious with this new increase and they have shared their opinions. This increase in gas taxes has shook Ohio. This will most likely have a negative impact on everyone.

“I think this is just another way the government is trying to take our money,” OHS Economic teacher Keeley Hickey said.

It seems that the community here in Lewis Center is not happy with this new tax law. They have given their honest opinion. This outcome has really gotten people’s attention. Civilians here in Ohio have given their opinion on this whole ordeal with Dewine and his call to action for higher gas prices. There are points going towards why this is a difficult situation. People say there is no need for these increases and it just makes others lives harder.

“It seems we are paying more than other states for gas if they raise the price,” Caroline H. ‘21 said.